12.06.2012

Trepidation - Belgian Tripel DIPA with Brett Drie and Wyeast French Saison



I wanted to brew something big for a yeast cake I had of a Session Saison Brett.  Because I  loved my first version of a Belgian Tripel/DIPA that I brewed a year ago that was inspired by Houblon Chouffe.   In addition to that, I also loved the Anchorage Brewing Bitter Monk when I had it in La Crosse at The Bodega a year ago.   I decided that I'd try my shot at something similar.   Anchorage Brewing Bitter Monk is a Belgian-Style DIPA aged in Chardonnay barrels with Brett.   It had a whole lot going on and the Chardonnay character was maybe a little too much, but the idea of it was amazing, and the execution was phenomenal and so I decided I must try and create something like this.   I paid $18 for a 750 ml of this beer and if I can create 5 gallons of something similar... I'll be living like a king!  

I took a pretty traditional Belgian Tripel grain bill, and then hopped it up with a mix of hops to reach a balance of earthyness in the flavor and then the piney, fruity aspects in the aroma.   The brett drie and Saison yeast should give a fruity flavor to the beer as well as spicyness on the nose. 

My brett of choice for this beer is brett drie for hoppy beers where you want more fruit and less funk.   Brett drie is an amazing bretta strain in that it has little "tradional" brett characteristics like barnyard, horse hay, cat piss, and more of the spicy fruity ones, like POG or tropical fruit.   In fact it's very similar to Wyeast French Saison in my opinion.   That all being said, I thought it would be a great complement to this beer. 

Both Wyeast French Saison and Brett Drie will help to attenuate this beer to an extremely high level.  For that reason, I mashed really high at 157 degrees as to not dry this out too far! Since Wyeast French Saison is similar to Wyeast Belgian Ardennes, I thought it could be a good idea for this beer!   I've always wonder how dry Wyeast French Saison would get when mashed high and now we'll find out! 

I'll sample it in a couple weeks a see where it's headed, and may add a tiny bit of oak chips that have been soaked in chardonnay.  That is completely up in the air right now.



Batch Size: 5.75 gallons
Specific Gravity: 1.073 OG
Color: 7° SRM Gold to Copper
Mash Efficiency: 65 %
Bitterness: 56 IBU
Alcohol: 8.7% ABV
Calories: 236 per 12 oz.
Mash Temp: 157-158 degrees
Fermentation Temp: 72 degrees

Malt & Fermentables


%
LB
OZ


°L
PPG

91%
17
~
Rahr Pilsner Malt

Mash
34

5%
1
~
Belgian Candi Sugar - Clear

Boil
32

2%
~
6
Belgian Biscuit Malt

Mash
24°
35

2%
~
6
Belgian Aromatic

Mash
23°
34


19
12




Hops


Usage
Time
OZ


AA » IBU

boil
60 min
0.6
Columbus
13.5 » 21.8

boil
10 min
1
Columbus
13.5 » 13.2

boil
10 min
1
Sterling
6.3   » 6.2

boil
10 min
2
Styrian Goldings
3.6   » 7.0

boil
1 min
1 ½
Amarillo
7.0   » 1.2

boil
1 min
0.3
Apollo
19.7 » 0.7

boil
1 min
1
Columbus
13.5 » 1.6

boil
1 min
1
Simcoe
11.0 » 1.3

boil
1 min
0.3
Summit
18.0 » 0.6

dry hop
10 days
2
Amarillo
7.0   » 0.0

dry hop
10 days
0.5
Simcoe
19.7 » 0.0

dry hop
10 days
1
Sterling
6.3   » 0.0

Yeast

French Saison (3711)
WLP644 Brettanomyces bruxellensis Trois

  1. My only worry is that this beer will dry out too much.  
  2. My related worry is that the beer will be too bitter.
  3. My only other worry is that the hops I used won't mesh with the Saison and Brett.
  4. My only other worry is that I'll add oak and chardonnay to a perfectly good beer and make it too complex and muttled.
  5. My only other worry is that, I need to Stop Making Sense!
***Name inspired by Russian River, beer inspired by Houblon Chouffe and Bitter Monk, recipe created by me.   

11.26.2012

Sour Rye Stout with ECY20 Bug County



After about two years of brewing beers with mixed fermentation (sacc, brett, pedio, and lacto) I've actually started bottling and drinking a few of these beers and have been pleasantly surprised by the results.   Saison Bretts can be done in a relatively short period of time (3-6 months), but the sour beers with pedio and lacto take anywhere from 9 months to 2 years or more.    With bottling my first sour beers, Flanders Red, and my Kriek, I sort of discontinued my Flanders series by unintentionally not brewing Flanders beers regularly.    Looking at my line up of beers in carboys I have a whole bunch of light sour beers.   I have 3 or 4 sour Saison's, a Sour Blonde Biere De Garde, an Ithaca Brute Clone, a Lambic, but nothing at all with any color or roast.    I decided that I need to make an effort to brew up some darker style sour beers so that I can get a good understanding of how dark malts hold up to the onslaught of funky mixed fermentations.  

Because Flanders Reds are the most common style of dark sour beer, that is the obvious choice, but recently I had the pleasure of sampling The Bruery Tart of Darkness which is a soured Stout.   I say pleasure, but really it was a challenge for me to drink this beer as it was so extremely tart that I had trouble getting it down.  It took me about 30 minutes to drink a pint, and luckily I shared it with my bro Pawl.   Despite it's extreme-ness, I was definitely intrigued and thought that with a little less sourness, this could be a really amazing drinkable Stout.   The Bruery is now selling this homebrew clone kit on Morebeer.com and so I looked at that recipe and tweaked it a little bit.   Instead of flaked oats I opted for flaked rye.    I've never used rye before but I've always loved what it brings to the table in a Saison, an IPA, and Porters and Stouts.   I thought that if it will help retain a little bit of body in this beer as well as add some spicyness, that could be a really great thing.  This is essentially a Tart of Darkness clone, but with Rye and fermented with East Coast Yeast ECY20- Bug County!   Here is the description of the yeast from the Love2Brew homebrew supply website which is where I bought it..."The mother bugger for sour ales. Contains ECY01, ECY02, ECY03, ECY04, and ECY05. Also includes: Brettanomyces lambicus, bruxellensis, anomulus, clausenii, custersianus, nanus, and naardenensis. Various Lactobacilli and Pediococci were added to round out this LIMITED RELEASE sour blend for 2011."  (maybe a little TOO much going on, but the verdict is still out on ECY20)


Here is my recipe.   I mashed high at 158 degrees and sparged at 168 degrees.

Batch Size: 5.5 Gallons
Specific Gravity: 1.058 OG
Color: 35° SRM  -  Black
Mash Efficiency: 67 %
Bitterness: 10.3 IBU
Alcohol:  6.9% ABV ?
Calories:  187 per 12 oz.

 

Malt & Fermentables





%
LB
OZ


°L
PPG
79%
11
~
Briess Organic 2-Row

Mash

34
7%
1
~
Flaked Rye

Mash

36
7%
1
~
Breiss Organic Crystal 60L

Mash

60°
34
4%
~
8
Roasted Barley - 550L

Mash

550°
34
3%
~
6
Bairds Chocolate Malt

Mash

475°
33

13
14




11.19.2012

Berliner 3191 | Saison 3726 | 3 Brett Strains | 11 gallons

I have some very exciting news for all of the Bretta freaks out there.  I had a baby boy and I named him Brett! 

Just kidding, I had a baby and I named him Benjamin although my homebrew club thought for sure I'd name him Brett Lambicus Pederson.   Actually I would have preferred Brett Claussenii Pederson or Brett Drie Pederson, but Benjamin it is!!!

With baby Benny on his way into the world, I didn't have time for anything but an extract brew, but hear is what transpired...

I acquired 3 NEW strains of Bretta a few weeks back.  Okay, they aren't new strains of brettanomyces as they came from a bottle of Cantillon Iris, but they are NEW to ME!   A few weeks back I saw a post by BKYeast where he said he had issolated 3 strains of Brett from a bottle of Cantillon Iris, as well as issolated the Brett strain in the Wyeast 3191 Berliner Weiss blend.   He then went on to say that he cultured them all up separately and those that emailed, he would sent them out for FREE!  All I had to do was pay for shipping!   What a generous guy...right!   Really cool!

So, I ended up getting some Wyeast Brett 3191 Brett issolate, as well as C2, and C3 as he was out of C1 already.  I'm assuming he called them C1, C2, C3 to show that they were issolated from (C)antillon.  

Also in my fridge I had a smack pack of Wyeast 3191 Berliner Blend, and some Wyeast 3726 Farmhouse Ale.  (I'd never done a Berliner, and I'd never used this specific Saison yeast).

Because I wanted to test all of these strains out and get some nice yeast cakes to build up a nice supply of these special strains of Brett, Yeast, and Lacto I decided to make a really simple "starter beer". From this I'll be able to get to know Wyeast 3726 and see how I like this strain that I've heard so much about, as well as I'll have some idea of what the different Brett Strains will contribute to whatever beers I decide to put those in.   Also I'll have a variety of bugs to "accidentally" spill into the 2 Red Wine Barrels my club is about to fill up! 

Here are my "Extract Starter Beers" of Funk!
  • 3726 Farmhouse - 5 gallons
  • 3191 Berliner Weiss Blend - 3 gallons
  • 3191 Brett isolate from BKyeast- 1 gallons
  • C2from BKyeast - 1 gallons
  • C3 from BKyeast - 1 gallons

Berliner Brett Saison


Batch Size: 11 gallons
Specific Gravity: 1.026 OG
Color:   SRM  Yellow
Bitterness: 5.9 IBU  ƒ: Tinseth
Alcohol: 2.9% ABV
Calories: 84 per 12 oz.

Malt & Fermentables


%
LB
OZ


PPG

75%
6
~

Boil

34

25%
2
~

Late Boil

43


8
0




Usage
Time
OZ


AA » IBU

boil

60 min
0.67
Goldings, East Kent ~ pellet

3.8 » 5.9

11.07.2012

Basque Cider | Native Fermentation of Cider | Graff


Cider is an amazingly refreshing drink and I think that it can appeal to people that like wine, and also people that enjoy sour beer.   Wine and sour beer are typically dry, acidic, fruity.  These are all similar characteristics that apply to cider.

Last year I did a French Style cidre that was brewed with a French yeast and then back sweetened to give it additional apple aroma, flavor, and also sweetness. Through the summer drinking my French Cider I found myself mixing it half an half with a Brett IPA I had on tap.  This "Graff" was fantastic and I decided that I preferred a cider that was dry, but also more complex then the cider's I've tried in the past.  With my desire for more complexity, of course,  I decided that making a dry funky complex cider was the direction my 2012 cider project would go.
With my allotted 10 gallons of 2012 fresh pressed unpasteurized cider I decide to create a Farmhouse style cider that not many people know about.   It's easy to make a dry Cider because the simple sugars are easily fermented to terminal gravity.   What I don't like is how boring, and one dimensional these dry ciders can be when fermented with a wine, cider, or beer yeast.   They typically have very little apple flavor or aroma left.   In doing some research online and talking with fellow members of the Nordeast Brewers Alliance I came across a funky style of cider that is produced in the Basque region of Spain.   The most commonly found Basque cider in the US is Isastegi.  Basque cider is naturally fermented and there are definite similarities between Basque style cider and sour beer as Basque cider has a pronounced Brettanomyces component to it when allowed to age.    For those of you that are unfamiliar with the Basque region of Spain, it is on the northern coast of Spain right near where Spain borders France.   There is an amazing town right in this region called San Sebastian that is an absolute must visit if you ever go to this region.   I've spent some time in San Sebastian and they have a great surf break, a beautiful beach for laying around, and also enough little pubs to satisfy your thirst for days. 

Here is going to be my process with my Ciders this year.   All 10 gallons are currently fermenting away using the native yeast that was present in the unpasteurized apple cider.  This is Native Fermentation and it is definitely already producing something very nice and clean.   The Native fermentation is in somewhat of a revival in the wine industry and is suppose to reflect the terroir as well as produce a rounder more full finished product.   My apple juice started out at OG of 1.050 on Sunday and in three days it had dropped to1.035.   I also took a PH reading and it started at 3.6 PH.  I heard from the organizer of the cider buy that last year his portion that was naturally fermented came down to 1.004.    In a week or so I plan to add some Brettanomyces to 5 gallons of the cider and plan on leaving the other portion normal with only the natural yeast.   I'm considering trying to use that yeast cake to ferment some wort, but I'll probably try it with a starter before pitching a full 5 gallons with this local apple yeast.    My guess is that it will have trouble with the complex sugars in malt.  We shall see. At some point I will look at adding a small amount of french oak cubes to this. 

***Graff is not an official term for beer/cider mixture.  It's actually a fictional beverage created by Stephen King for The Dark Tower series (one of my favorite series of books).   There is actually not a lot of actual information on the style although it makes for a very tasty beverage.   I particularily found that apple cider enhances many different types of sour beer!   Mixing my Kriek with Cider was a beautiful marriage of flavors!

 

10.17.2012

More Barrels! (4) French Oak Wine Barrels freshly emptied



 Well, this is a classic "Field of Dreams" type story of  "If you build it, they will come." 

This little story I'm about to tell is my own Field of Dreams, but I'm going to call it Barrel Cellar of Dreams.   Since I started writing on this blog I've had a bunch of people make comments and reach out to me with advice, or thanking me for publishing my own advice, trials, and tribulation.  Mainly trials.   Anyways, along the way I also started a little homebrew club in my neighborhood called the Nordeast Brewers Alliance.   This club has allowed me first to "stop talking about brewing to my wife", who apparently could care less about whether I batch, or fly sparge.   Anyways, along with the HBC has come some amazing experiments.  Our annual Single Hop experiment is a big draw and something you can't do by yourself very effectively.   Another project that we've done is the Barrel aged Project.   This is another thing that you simply can't do by yourself.  (You could, but who wants 59 gallons of the same beer for personal consumption).    Anyways, through writing about my experiences as the barrel wrangler for our club, our club has received a lot of local interest, as well as people reaching out to us wanting to get involved.   Luckily, somehow my blog reached, or our HBC blog got on the computer of a former San Franciscan resident (Lodi actually) getting ready to move back home to beautiful Minneapolis.    He reached out to me, and turns out he had 4 freshly emptied French Oak wine barrels.   As fate would have it, we seem to be simpatico in aspects of music (Phish, Big Wu, ect), beer, and life in general (Hockey) .   Turns out he is looking to fill these barrels up with beer, and I have just the crew to do that!  Luckily, one of our club members has the perfect "Barrel Room" in his basement and is willing to take on the responsibility of housing, maintaining, and managing our "new" barrels. 

 Here is a little background on the barrels.   Apparently Casey had become friends with some of the local Wineries in Lodi and upon leaving town, he snagged a few barrels that had been freshly emptied of their juice.

Both of these wineries employ "Native Fermentation" which means that they don't initially pitch yeast, but allow the nature local yeast to take hold in the wine adding complexity and truly embracing the terroir.   With that, it would seem that it may be tough to produce a "clean" beer with these barrels so we are looking to introduce mixed fermentation into anything we decide to put into these barrels!

French Oak Barrels
(2) from Fields Family Wines, and (2) from McCay Cellars.   The McCay cellars barrels are heavier duty barrels compared to the Fields Barrels which is interesting.  The staves must be thicker.   All of these barrels were first filled with grape juice in 2008.   McCay's were filled with their highly rated Zinfandel, and the Fields barrels were filled with Cab and Merlot.

A few notes from sniffing the bungs in order to figure out what to fill them with.

Barrel #1 - McCay Zin  - Medium/Heavy Oak, vanilla, blackberries, currants.
Barrel #2 - McCay Zin  - Medium/Heavy Oak, vanilla, fruity cocoa.
Barrel #3 - Fields Merlot - Light Oak, red fruit, cherries.
Barrel #4 - Fields Cab - Light Oak, light fruit



Here's what I'm thinking as far as filling the barrels-


Barrel #1 - Wee Heavy (clean)
Barrel #2 - Russian Imperial Stout
Barrel #3 - Flanders Style Red Ale - Awarded winning recipe
Barrel #4 - Saison or Dark Saison (Honey and Figs)

10.11.2012

Harvest Brown Ale (Hoppy Dank Brown Ale) with Midnight Wheat and Honey



With the Harvest Moon in the night sky and the hops harvest over, it was time once again to brew my favorite beer of the year.   My yearly harvest time hoppy brown ale.   For those who lean towards a darker beer in the Fall and Winter months but lean towards IPA's in the summer, this is the perfect transition beer!   This year I decided against using locally grown hops and decided to use locally sourced Honey that I bought from the NE Mpls Farmers Market.   I love using honey in my IPA's for a few reasons.   Honey is extremely fermentable and will help dry out the beer, and I like my IPA's fairly dry.   The other added benefit is that it does leave a little bit of residual sweetness that I like instead of excessive amounts of Crystal malt.  That all being said, I started thinking more and more about honey lately because of my sons love for the cartoon movie "Bee Movie."   This movie got me thinking about honey and why and how bees make honey.  They make it to eat during the winter months.   In my research on honey I came upon this little fact..."it takes about 556 foraging bees to visit 2 million flowers, just to make a pound of honey!"   That's what went into this beer!   Some more fun facts about honey and bees....


Why do bees make honey?
We know that bees have been producing honey as they do today for at least 150 million years. Bees produce honey as food stores for the hive during the long months of winter when flowers aren't blooming and therefore little or no nectar is available to them. European honey bees, genus Apis Mellifera, produce such an abundance of honey, far more than the hive can eat, that humans can harvest the excess. For this reason, European honey bees can be found in beekeeper's hives around the world!

The Colony
Honey bees are social insects, with a marked division of labor between the various types of bees in the colony. A colony of honey bees includes a queen, drones and workers.
 
The Queen 
The queen is the only sexually developed female in the hive. She is the largest bee in the colony.
A two-day-old larva is selected by the workers to be reared as the queen. She will emerge from her cell 11 days later to mate in flight with approximately 18 drone (male) bees. During this mating, she receives several million sperm cells, which last her entire life span of nearly two years.
The queen starts to lay eggs about 10 days after mating. A productive queen can lay 3,000 eggs in a single day.

The Drones
Drones are stout male bees that have no stingers. Drones do not collect food or pollen from flowers. Their sole purpose is to mate with the queen. If the colony is short on food, drones are often kicked out of the hive.

The Workers
Workers, the smallest bees in the colony, are sexually undeveloped females. A colony can have 50,000 to 60,000 workers.  The life span of a worker bee varies according to the time of year. Her life expectancy is approximately 28 to 35 days. Workers that are reared in September and October, however, can live through the winter.  Workers feed the queen and larvae, guard the hive entrance and help to keep the hive cool by fanning their wings. Worker bees also collect nectar to make honey.  In addition, honey bees produce wax comb. The comb is composed of hexagonal cells which have walls that are only 2/1000 inch thick, but support 25 times their own weight.   Honey bees' wings stroke 11,400 times per minute, thus making their distinctive buzz.\

Anywho....

I’ve tried for three years to bitter my beers with locally grown hops to very mixed results.   Instead of using locally grown hops,  I decided I wanted to really dial in my DANK hop profile.  I fell like Centennial may be the perfect match for this task with it’s burnt citrus pungency.   I’ve been trying to reach a certain hop profile in my IPA’s lately and they always seem to be overpowered by Simcoe, or Citra, or any of the very distinct American fruity varieties of hops.  I’m hoping that Centennial with my Summit/Apollo blend is the right blend for what I’m going for.  I wanted to get a nice brown color but I didn’t want huge chocolate, roast, or really much character from roasted malts what so ever.  Instead I wanted a nice big mouthfeel, a tiny bit of caramel and toffee (Maris Otter and Caramel), some sweetness and dryness from honey, and then absolutely be blasted by dank resinous hops that lean more toward pine and less on the citrus.   .   I decided that in place of Chocolate Malt, and Roast Malt, that I’d go with Midnight Wheat.   It should provide a tiny bit of roastiness, but mainly will aid in the color and mouthfeel of this beer.   In order to get a substantial enough mouthfeel I decided to mash at 156 for 60 minutes.  The idea being that the addition of honey will thin the beer out, so mashing high will balance that out.  This beer definitely looks more like a West Coast IPA, but people will say that it’s a Black IPA and that it doesn’t have enough roast flavor for a Black IPA.  Well…that’s exactly what I was going for…you can’t put me into a box.


Specific Gravity: 1.067
Final Gravity: 1.016?
Color: 26° SRM  Dark Brown to Black
Mash Efficiency: 76 %
Bitterness:  71.9 IBU
Alcohol: 6.7% ABV
Calories: 221 per 12 oz.

Malt & Fermentables


%
LB
OZ



48%
6
8

Mash

37%
5
~

Mash

7%
1
~

Boil

4%
~
8

Mash

4%
~
8

Mash


13
8



Hops


Usage
Time
OZ


AA

first wort
60 min
0.7
Chinook
5.0

boil
75 min
0.3
Chinook
5.0

boil
10 min
1
Apollo
19.7

boil
10 min
1
Centennial
10.0

boil
10 min
1
Simcoe
13.0

boil
1 min
1
Apollo
19.7

boil
1 min
1
Centennial
10.0

boil
1 min
1
Summit
18.0

dry hop
7 days
2
Apollo
19.7

dry hop
7 days
1
Centennial
10.0

dry hop
7 days
2
Summit
18.0

Yeast

Dennys Favorite 50 (1450)


***I also took ¾ gallon of this wort and fermented it on 100% Brett Drie.  Whoa baby that is gonna be tasty!

10.10.2012

Manoomin Knocker - Wild Rice Imperial Mild Ale


 I brewed a batch of beer on the first of October that I thought would be an amazing seasonal beer and I hope to add a Wild Rice beer to my lineup every Fall during the harvest season.   I love using local ingredients in my recipe’s whenever possible and after sampling a version of this beer and hearing that it had Wild Rice in it, I thought I had to give it a try!!!  This recipe is inspired by Tim Stuemke who is a founding member of the Nordeast Brewers Alliance.  Although typically Mild Ales are much lighter in body, lower in alcohol, and slightly roasty Brown Ales typically in the mid 1.030 range.  This beer is called an Imperial Mild mainly to be funny as historically Mild Ales have found their way up into the 1.050+ Gravity range.    The key is that a Mild Ale be very sessionable!!!  Mild ales are typically a bit thin, yet bold in flavor, and I wanted an even bolder version to go with Minnesota’s bolder version of Winter!   This beer could easily be called a Brown Ale.

Wild Rice - Experience/History - Wild Rice is an interesting plant. My first experience with it was when I was a kid on a canoe trip in the BWCA (Boundary Waters Canoe Area).   A group of us kids and a couple of dads took a week long trip up north paddling, portaging, cliff jumping, camping, foraging for blueberries, catching fish, and living with and off the land.   On one of the last days we paddled along a lazy small river in between a couple large lakes and we were surrounded by wild rice much like this picture below.

If you want to learn more about Wild Rice, go to the Wiki page HERE.   Kinda interesting...as it's not rice at all, it's actually closer related to grass.  Foragging for Wild Rice is a laborious task that intails canoeing and knocking the grain into your canoe.  Processing Wild Rice is even more interesting and time consuming then knocking the grain.  Check out this Video on how Wild Rice is traditionally processed.

All in all the Wild Rice is going to give this beer a "nutty" character that otherwise couldn't be acheived.

Cereal Mash –
The usage of Wild Rice brings up some questions.   How do I handle the Wild Rice? It’s extremely hard to break down, and how to extract the sugars from it?  Well what you need to do is a Cereal Mash.   For this beer I ground up the wild rice with my coffee grinder extremely fine in order to make the starches more accessible.  Then I put it in equal parts water…1 lb/1 gallon and slowly brought that to a boil.   Once that was boiling I kept it rolling for a good hour!   I could have also added in a bit of grain (for their enzymes) and done a quick Sacc rest at 150 degrees, but since I was going to add it to the mash I know I’d get full conversion.  By the end of the hour it essentially looks like thick cooked rice and you really couldn’t boil it any longer without adding more water.   Keep in mind that you need to be stirring throughout this time as to not scorch the rice.  Especially during the last 15 minutes. 

For mashing the other grains I decide to mash in real thick and do a quick Protein rest at 120 degrees.   It sat there for only about 5 minutes at most and then I dumped in my boiling hot cereal mash of wild rice.  This brought the temperature up to 148.  I was shooting for 150-152 so I added about ½ gallon of boiling water and then let it rest for the 1 hour.    Batch Sparged as normal at 168 degrees and I was ready to boil.  Once the boil had finished I chilled it and pitch my yeast after pouring it back and forth to oxygenate.   I fermented it at 67-68 degrees in my basement and this should create a slightly fruity fermentation and add additional character to the Toasty (Maris Otter), and Nutty (Wild Rice), sweetness and caramel toffee (Cystal 60 /120),  Earthyness of the hops,  as well as complement the small amount of darker roastier grains. (Pale Chocolate/ Black Patent).  The Melanoidin malt should give the beer a substantial body that is a little bit off for the style, but I personally enjoy.

Wild Rice Imperial Mild Ale

Mash Efficiency: 72 %
Specific Gravity: 1.052 OG
Final Gravity:     1.016 FG
Alcohol: 4.8% ABV
Calories: 173  per 12 oz.
Color: 17° SRM  Light Brown to Medium Brown
Bitterness: 19.7 IBU  Tinseth

Malt & Fermentables

%
LB
OZ




62%
6
~

Mash


21%
2
~

Cereal Mash/

Mash
5%
~
8

Mash

5%
~
8

Mash


4%
~
6

Mash


3%
~
4

Mash


1%
~
1

Mash




9
11




Hops

Usage
Time
OZ


AA » IBU
boil
60 min
1
East Kent Goldings ~ pellet
5.0 » 19.7

Yeast

London ESB Ale (1968)
yeast in liquid form with very high flocculation and 69% attenuation
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